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  • Don Wood Inc. Team

Primary Components of Generators and Sub-Tanks - Advantages & Disadvantages

The primary component of the generator is the Sub Base Tank, which is a tank that sits beneath the generator. The sub-base tank, as the name suggests, serves as a basis or foundation for the generator and is positioned on top of it. This is often used on smaller volume applications because if you have a 10,000-gallon tank, the tank volume and the square footage will be too high in order to accommodate a generator on top of it. In that case, the generator would need to be beside it.

sub-base


A generator can be placed on top of a smaller tank, such as a 5000-gallon or even a 2000-gallon tank. When you're installing a new generator system and want everything to be ready in one package, this is the way to go. However, there are certain benefits and drawbacks to doing it this way.


What are the Advantages and Disadvantages?

The biggest disadvantage I notice is that those tanks are more prone to failing, typically after 10-15 years and when they do, it's extremely difficult to replace a tank since the generator is already installed and there's a pipe on top of this sub-base tank. On the other hand, if you have a tank that is placed to the side of the generator, it will only be a fraction of the time, labor, and cost because there's no need to move the generator to access the sub-base tank beneath. These are the main differences when looking at these two options.


One of the biggest concerns we're seeing is that the sub-base tank is failing, and I believe it's due to moisture accumulation in the interstitial region, which we refer to as the space between primary and secondary containment. There are also additional issues such as increased generator vibrations and other factors such as the fact that the inner tank's thickness typically is only about 12 gauge. When you combine all those variables, it's easy to see why sub-base tanks are beginning to fail and leak in from the primary to the secondary containment.


Another issue that arises is whether or not a sub-base tank might be fixed. It is possible to restore these tanks with the appropriate contractor and approvals. In some circumstances, you might cut the sub-basting slice off, strap the repaired side, maintain the one with a few welded repairs and then reinsert it into the bottom of the generator.


It is possible to restore these tanks with the appropriate contractor and approvals. In some circumstances, you might cut the sub-basting slice off, strap the repaired side, maintain the one with a few welded repairs, and then reinsert it into the bottom of the generator. This is a possibility for most, but please understand it cannot always be done. The main focus is that when the tanks are on the side of the generator as opposed to on top, it allows for easy access to be inspected or replaced when needed without having to interrupt the generator.


What are the accessories and parts of a tank or a generator tank?

And that's where Fill comes in. The Fill is where the delivery company used to fill up the tank. It has an overfill prevention device that keeps the tank from being filled at more than 90 percent capacity. We also have vents in place to allow for proper venting of the tank and prevent pressure build-up inside it. We even have emergency evacuation vents, which are bigger openings that will open up and let a lot more air into the tank if there is an event of an explosion or fire being built up inside the tank. If this were to ever happen the tank will open and allow more air inside as opposed to exploding. This is due to the advantages of having the proper gauges installed to tell how much fuel is in the tank. We offer various gauges upon installation that cater to the safety and regulation of the tank.


There is a space between the primary and secondary containments called the interstitial space. Most tanks are double-walled and offer sensors here as well for added safety. There is a space between the primary and secondary containments called the interstitial space. Most tanks are double-walled and offer sensors here as well for added safety. These sensors communicate with an electronic visual and audio alarm key. There is also the option of having these sensors attached to a mechanical gauge that sits on top of this interstitial space, and it will indicate via a float if there is any liquid located in the space.


There is a lot to know and understand about these tanks. I hope this information has proven to be valuable. For estimates or service please call 407-293-0891 or visit www.donwoodinc.com. We serve Central Florida & More.


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